Who is the Yellow King

Fan theories for the identity of the Yellow King from HBO's True Detective.

Reblogged from maksutam

maksutam:

True Detective Challenge: 1 gifset per episode
→ 7 After You’ve Gone

neresta:

True Detective fan art. Never tought that Mattheew McConaughey is such a wonderful actor. They all are good there, but his Rusty is the best!
 

Reblogged from neresta

neresta:

True Detective fan art. Never tought that Mattheew McConaughey is such a wonderful actor. They all are good there, but his Rusty is the best!

 

Reblogged from maksutam

maksutam:

True Detective Challenge: 1 gifset per episode
→ 8 Form and Void

Reblogged from maverpix

fuckyeahmovieposters:

True Detective by Bárány Dániel

Reblogged from fuckyeahmovieposters

fuckyeahmovieposters:

True Detective by Bárány Dániel

twatintweed:

Man is the cruelest animal

Reblogged from hvelfa

twatintweed:

Man is the cruelest animal

Reblogged from bustedtees

bustedtees:

The best mug this side of Carcosa! 

It’s an ad, but damn is it good.

'True Detective' finale review: Truth, justice, and the satisfying surprise of a happy ending

Reblogged from the-syndic4te

the-syndic4te:

"We start on the outskirts of the infernal plane. We begin in hell on earth. The ersatz underworld of The Yellow King — a.k.a. Errol Childress, a perverse product of paternal abuse, generational evil, and his own deranged, pop-culture informed myth-making — was a theater of the mind for a fantasy made real: His vision of Carcosa, the necropolis of Ambrose Bierce and the fallen world of Robert W. Chambers, littered with dead trees and body bags. Childress lured Cohle into his ascension chamber — the staging area for so many murders, and last night, a stage for an ancient ritual, the oldest story of all. Light versus dark. Good versus evil. “Little priest” versus wannabe Elder God. It was The Real World: Dungeons and Dragons, and Cohle, hard boiled to the core, was ready to play. I’ll see your abyss and gaze right back, Lawnmower Man!

He was fooling himself. Rust Cohle has always been fooling himself. His cynicism, his callousness were parts of the mask he wore to engage the world, to deal with himself. But it offered no protection when his mind — tweaking from the fetid evil around him — conspired against him and waylaid him with a vision of a coal-black vortex spiraling down to claim him. Maybe you were thinking: They’re going to do it! Cthulhu is coming! Coming to take us away, ha-ha! Ho-ho! Hee-hee! Beam me up, Lovecraft!

But no. It was gotcha moment, for Rust, and for us. Childress seized him and cut him to the core, literally and spiritually, like a knife to an empty can of Lone Star. “TAKE OFF YOUR MASK!” The Monster bellowed. It was as if Childress was telling him to cut the phony bologna nihilist crap, the useful fairy tale of baggy and buggy sentient meat denying his truth. Of course, you can say the same of his agent of enlightenment, his doppelganger. True Detective was always all about authenticity — or rather, the lack thereof, and the stories we tell ourselves  to get us through the day (religion, or nothingness, or our private Carcosas) and in turn imprint (and inflict) upon the world.

What happened after Rust’s gutting exposes us as well: the final 15 minutes of “Form and Void” struck me as a Rorschach test for what you want from stories like this, for what we’ve come to call “resolution,” And boy, did we get a lot of it, both implied and explicitly stated, no more so during the last scene, with all of its mansplaining and bromantic uplift. Yes, uplift. The twist ending of True Detective’s bleak first season: a bracing refutation of its baroque pessimism. Cohle and Hart slayed the decadently dandy slumdog (schizo?) psycho at dream’s end, spent a good chunk of time processing their feelings and baring their souls, then exited, stage right, to star in The Odd Couple sitcom we’ll never get to see. They were as stunned by this turn of events as we were. Cohle and Hart, flawed heroes and failed men, expected to be destroyed by their bid to pay the debt they owed the world, and so did I. If you had told me four episodes ago, after Rust’s ugly Crash digression and Marty’s complete unraveling, that we’d get a happy ending in which they’d be laughing and hugging and telling stories about the stars — like myth-making bards of antiquity — I would have thought you were a sauce-knackered tent preacher. What does say that about me? Perhaps a lifetime spent consuming stories has shaped my imagination to assume the worst. Or maybe I’m just, like, a really hideous person.

And so instead of losing their lives, Cohle and Hart were rewarded with new life. Marty found a little redemption — but not too much — and reconciliation he thought beyond him. Rust found some catharsis for the past, triggered by a near-death experience as his sense of self was becoming incoherent and fading away: A feeling of love and connection with his dead daughter and his beloved father. He wanted to sink and dissipate into that deep: “I said, ‘Darkness, yeah! [Instant classic McConaughey-ism!] And then I woke up,” said Cohle, despairing that what felt so metaphysically real was only a dream. Still, in this moment, we truly saw Cohle for the first time: He shed his last layer to reveal the profound grief that drove him. Wow. I thought we would get a grim and gritty climax that affirmed a gloomy worldview; we thought we would get Chinatown. Instead, we got the deconstruction of hipster/pulp cynicism that says heroism is a crock and the recovery of old school virtue; we got Casablanca.

A toast to Cohle and Hart, who deserve to be the penultimate* final statement on an era of anti-heroism and hideous men: Here’s to the beginning of a beautiful relationship.”

*I think Don Draper should get the final word on this, don’t you?

New questions.

With the end of True Detective season 1, I am left with more questions and I hope to have them answered in future episodes.

1) Who exactly is the Yellow King?
This is a huge can of worms in it self. We know that he is an odd ball psychopath, but who is the family that he comes from? How is he and Tuttle related? Why do people look the other way of his killings? How did he get his scars? He is a mysterious figure, able to play many roles from the dumb down janitor to an eloquent gentleman. What was he trying to achieve with his monument?

2) Where did Rust go for those 10 years?
We know he went to Alaska and such, but is that even true? How did he cope with the fact that the Yellow King was still loose? Did he slowly slip into the state he is by the end of Season 1 or was their a breaking point? This history would be very interesting to learn about.

3) What about Marty Hart’s daughter?
She drew some questionable pictures in her diary, she went to a Tuttle school being creeped on by the Yellow King possibly. She re-enacted the 5 men rape scene with her dolls. And her life went to shit as she grew up similarly like the other children that Rust was investigating. What more does she know what happened at these schools and the Yellow King that no one has talked about?


4) Who were the other men in the video?
This one has to be the basis for the rest of the series. There are 5 men in the video, the 5 men motif has been cropping up everywhere in the 1st season, but we only really know of Tuttle as one of them. Have the other men left the area to wreak havoc in the world or are they all in the same state? If we jump to new locations we’ll definitely get some new characters, but in the vain of Carcosa there may be many similarities.

Which leads to…

5) What exactly happens in the video?
It may be too gruesome for HBO to show, or they like to let the viewer decide for themselves, but I would like to know what exactly happens in the video that everyone seems to be very distraught over. Is a child killed? assaulted? disemboweled? Just to what extent has this cult, for lack of a better word, has gone to in their crimes? It would help the viewer to know just how bad these men are and how they compare to the Yellow King.

zonanegativa:

Ilustración dedicada a True Detective por Johna Mor. No dejéis de echarle una ojeada a nuestro Especial True Detective: El nihilista y lovecraftiano thriller policíaco de Nic Pizzolatto

Reblogged from zonanegativa

zonanegativa:

Ilustración dedicada a True Detective por Johna Mor. No dejéis de echarle una ojeada a nuestro Especial True Detective: El nihilista y lovecraftiano thriller policíaco de Nic Pizzolatto